The Bomb – Inspirational Story | Arash

 
Did you ever hear of King Charles the Twelfth, of Sweden? He lived two hundred years ago, and was famous for his courage in defending his country.

One day he was in the midst of a great battle. The small house in which he had taken shelter was almost between the two armies.

He called to one of his officers and bade him sit down and write a short order for him.

The officer began to write, but just as he finished the first word, a bomb came through the roof of the house and struck the floor close by him. He dropped the pen and sprang to his feet. He was pale with fear. “What is the matter?” asked the king.

“Oh, sir,” he answered, “the bomb! the bomb!”

“Yes, I see,” said the king. “But what has the bomb to do with what I wish you to write? Sit down, and take your pen. When your country is in danger, you should forget your own safety.”


The Bomb- Inspirational Story



The inspirational story of The Bombincluded on this page is from the book Fifty Famous People – A Book of Short Stories by James Baldwin. The Book was Published in 1912 and James Baldwin describes each of the people included in the individual stories as having left “footprints on the sands of time”.
The Bomb

The story is based on the true life of the individual but is not a biography. It’s a truly inspirational tale and a great example of excellent moral values. Despite being written over one hundred years ago, the story is still relevant today. If you are looking for an inspirational story full of ideas and enthusiasm to read to your children, look no further! Just print off this page, bookmark it for later or save it to your favorites!  Discover the life of one of the fifty characters from the book ‘Fifty Famous People – A Book of Short Stories’ by James Baldwin. Each one of these amazing characters has left a legacy for us to enjoy and pass on to future generations.

“Read And You Will Know Story” | Arash

 
“Mother, what are the clouds made of? Why does the rain fall? Where does all the rain water go? What good does it do?”

Little William Jones was always asking questions.

“I want to know,” he said; “I want to know everything.”

At first his mother tried to answer all his questions. But after he had learned to read, she taught him to look in books for that which he wished to know.

“Mother, what makes the wind blow?”

“Read, and you will know, my child.”

“Who lives on the other side of the world?”

“Read, and you will know.”

“Why is the sky so blue?”

“Read, and you will know.”

“Oh, mother, I would like to know everything.”

“You can never know everything, my child. But you can learn many things from books.”

“Yes, mother, I will read and then I will know.”

He was a very little boy, but before he was three years old he could read quite well. When eight years of age he was the best scholar at the famous school at Harrow. He was always reading, learning, inquiring.

“I want to know; I want to know,” he kept saying.

“Read, and you will know,” said his mother. “Read books that are true. Read about things that are beautiful and good. Read in order to become wise.

“Do not waste your time in reading foolish books. Do not read bad books, they will make you bad. No book is worth reading that does not make you better or wiser.”

And so William Jones went on reading and learning. He became one of the most famous scholars in the world. The king of England made him a knight and called him Sir William Jones. Sir William Jones lived nearly two hundred years ago. He was noted for his great knowledge, the most of which he had obtained from books. It is said that he could speak and write forty languages.

The Lad Who Rode Sidesaddle | Arash


When Daniel Webster was a child he lived in the country, far from any city. He was not strong enough to work on the farm like his brothers; but he loved books and study.

He was very young when he was first sent to school. The schoolhouse was two or three miles from home, but he did not mind the long walk through the woods and over the hills.He soon learned all that his teacher could teach; for he was bright and quick, and had a good memory.

His father hoped that Daniel would grow up to be a wise and famous man. “But,” said he, “no man can rightly succeed without an education.”

So it was decided that the boy should go to some school where he might be prepared for college.

One evening his father said to him, “Daniel, you must be up early in the morning. You are going to Exeter with me.”

“To Exeter, father!” said Daniel.

“Yes, to Exeter. I am going to put you in the academy there.”

The academy at Exeter was a famous school for preparing boys for college. It is still a famous school. But Daniel’s father did not say anything about college.

There were no railroads at that time, and Exeter was nearly fifty miles away. Daniel and his father would ride there on horseback.

Early in the morning two horses were brought to the door. One was Mr. Webster’s horse; the other was an old gray nag with a lady’s sidesaddle on its back.

“Who is going to ride that nag?” asked Daniel.

“Young Dan Webster,” answered his father.

“But I don’t want a sidesaddle. I’m not a lady.”

“I understand,” said Mr. Webster. “But our neighbor, Johnson, is sending the nag to Exeter for the use of a lady who is to ride back with me. He does me a favor by allowing you to ride on the animal, and I do him a favor by taking care of it.”

“But won’t it look rather funny for me to ride to Exeter on a sidesaddle?”

“Well, if a lady can ride on it, perhaps Dan Webster can do as much.”

And so they set out on their journey to Exeter. Mr. Webster rode in front, and Daniel, on the old gray nag, followed behind. The roads were muddy, and they went slowly. It took them two days to reach Exeter.

The people whom they met gazed at them and wondered who they could be. They scarcely noticed the sidesaddle; they noticed only the boy’s dark eyes and his strong, noble face.

His clothes were of homemade stuff; his shoes were coarse and heavy; he had no gloves on his hands; he was awkward and bashful.

Yet there was something in his manner and voice that caused everybody to admire him.

Daniel Webster lived to become a famous orator and a great statesman.
He was honored at home and abroad.

The Paddle Wheel Boat |Arash

More than a hundred years ago, two boys were fishing in a small river. They sat in a heavy flat-bottomed boat, each holding a long, crooked rod in his hands and eagerly waiting for “a bite.”

When they wanted to move the boat from one place to another they had to pole it; that is, they pushed against a long pole, the lower end of which reached the bottom of the stream.

“This is slow work, Robert,” said the older of the boys as they were poling up the river to a new fishing place. “The old boat creeps over the water no faster than a snail.”

“Yes, Christopher; and it is hard work, too,” answered Robert. “I think there ought to be some better way of moving a boat.”

“Yes, there is a better way, and that is by rowing,” said Christopher.
“But we have no oars.”


“Well, I can make some oars,” said Robert; “but I think there ought to be still another and a better way. I am going to find such a way if I can.” The next day Robert’s aunt heard a great pounding and sawing in her woodshed. The two boys were there, busily working with hammer and saw. “What are you making, Robert?” she asked.

“Oh, I have a plan for making a boat move without poling it or rowing it,” he answered.

His aunt laughed and said, “Well, I hope that you will succeed.”

After a great deal of tinkering and trying, they did succeed in making two paddle wheels. They were very rough and crude, but strong and serviceable. They fastened each of these wheels to the end of an iron rod which they passed through the boat from side to side. The rod was bent in the middle so that it could be turned as with a crank. When the work was finished, the old fishing boat looked rather odd, with a paddle wheel on each side which dipped just a few inches into the water. The boys lost no time in trying it.

“She goes ahead all right,” said Christopher, “but how shall we guide her?”

“Oh, I have thought of that,” said Robert. He took something like an oarlock from his pocket and fastened it to the stern of the boat; then with a paddle which worked in this oarlock one of the boys could guide the boat while the other turned the paddle wheels.

“It is better than poling the boat,” said Christopher.

“It is better than rowing, too,” said Robert. “See how fast she goes!”

That night when Christopher went home he had a wonderful story to tell. “Bob Fulton planned the whole thing,” he said, “and I helped him make the paddles and put them on the boat.”

“I wonder why we didn’t think of something like that long ago,” said his father. “Almost anybody could rig up an old boat like that.”

“Yes, I wonder, too,” said Christopher. “It looks easy enough, now that Bob has shown how it is done.”

When Robert Fulton became a man, he did not forget his experiment with the old fishing boat. He kept on, planning and thinking and working, until at last he succeeded in making a boat with paddle wheels that could be run by steam.

He is now remembered and honored as the inventor of the steamboat. He became famous because he was always thinking and studying and working.

The heart of the american kingdom short story | Arash

Once America was ruled by a king who had no son to succeed to the throne. Since the king was getting old, he wanted to select a suitable heir to rule the country. The king sent out notices throughout his country. The notices invited every qualified young man in the country for an interview with the king. The outcome of the interview with the king would decide a possible successor to the throne. The only qualification for the candidate was that they should have immense love for their fellow human beings.

Every young man across the country was very excited at the possibilities of being the ruler of the country. A poor young man from a remote village also read the notice and started to prepare for an interview with the king. The man was a kind, hard working lad but he was very poor due to various circumstances. The man had no good clothes to be presentable in the sight of the king. So the young man worked really hard and saved some money to buy him a proper clothes and supplies to support him for a long journey to the palace.

After he got his supplies and a proper attire for the interview, the young man set out on his quest. He traveled many days and had almost completed the journey when he came upon a poor beggar by the side of the road. The poor beggar sat trembling in the cold, covered only in tattered rags. The beggar extended his arms and pleaded for help. His weak voice croaked, “I’m hungry and cold. Please help me sir.”

The young man was so moved by the pathetic condition of the beggar that he immediately stripped his new attire and offered it to him. He also provided him with his very limited food, he had carried for the journey. The beggar thanked the man immensely. Since the man had given up  his good clothes to the beggar, he was bit hesitant to go for the interview. He however gathered enough courage to  enter the palace in his old dirty clothes. Upon his arrival at the palace, a king’s attendant showed him the way to the great hall. After a short respite to clean off the journey’s grime, the man was admitted to the throne room for the interview.

The young man bowed low as the king entered the room. When he raised his eyes, he gasped in astonishment as he noticed that the king looked very similar the begger, he met on the way.

The king saw the shock in the man’s eye and said” Yes, i  was the beggar, you met on your way”

“But…bu…bu… why did you dress up like a beggar. You are king.  Well, then, why did you do this to me?” the young man stammered after gaining some composure.

“Because I had to be sure that you had a good heart and you genuinely love your fellow human beings,” said the king. “I knew that if I came to you as king, you would have done anything to impress me. But that way I would never have known what is truly in your heart. So I used a ruse. Beggar had nothing to offer you. The generosity and love to the one in need without expecting anything in return is the sign of a great heart. Looking at your love, generosity towards the beggar proved that you sincerely love your fellow human beings. This country needs a leader who would work for the welfare of all of the nation, not just ones who would offer and cater to the throne.  You have proved that you are the right person to be my successor,” promised the king.

The Dark Day | Arash

Listen, and I will tell you of the famous dark day in Connecticut. It was in the month of May, more than a hundred years ago.

The sun rose bright and fair, and the morning was without a cloud. The air was very still. There was not a breath of wind to stir the young leaves on the trees.

Then, about the middle of the day, it began to grow dark. The sun was hidden. A black cloud seemed to cover the earth.

The birds flew to their nests. The chickens went to roost. The cows came home from the pasture and stood mooing at the gate. It grew so dark that the people could not see their way along the streets.

Then everybody began to feel frightened. “What is the matter? What is going to happen?” each one asked of another. The children cried. The dogs howled. The women wept, and some of the men prayed.

“The end of the world has come!” cried some; and they ran about in the darkness.

“This is the last great day!” cried others; and they knelt down and waited.

In the old statehouse, the wise men of Connecticut were sitting. They were men who made the laws, and much depended upon their wisdom.

When the darkness came, they too began to be alarmed. The gloom was terrible.

“It is the day of the Lord.” said one.

“No use to make laws,” said another, “for they will never be needed.”

“I move that we adjourn,” said a third.

Then up from his seat rose Abraham Davenport.

His voice was clear and strong, and all knew that he, at least, was not afraid.

“This may be the last great day,” he said. “I do not know whether the end of the world has come or not. But I am sure that it is my duty to stand at my post as long as I live. So, let us go on with the work that is before us. Let the candles be lighted.”

His words put courage into every heart. The candles were brought in. Then with his strong face aglow in their feeble light, he made a speech in favor of a law to help poor fishermen.

And as he spoke, the other lawmakers listened in silence till the darkness began to fade and the sky grew bright again.

The people of Connecticut still remember Abraham Davenport, because he was a wise judge and a brave lawmaker. The poet Whittier has written a poem about him, which you will like to hear.