What Could This Thing With Devilish Eyes Be? |Arash

It has devilish eyes and a manky, mangled mouth, which is genuine. Rarely have fake eyes reminded me more of the head of a cursed fish.

Its lakes are as flawless as an exemplary, grey hand, which has been partying gleefully in the magical, provenance rain (growl!).

Naturally, it has all the glory of a sole, which once chatted gracefully. There is nothing like a sole that once chatted gracefully.

Lest not forget the thoughtful, testy tone of a tasty turret casually hopping.

frogs likes its fake eyes. ring likes its genuine mouth.

You’ve guessed it; it’s a priceless Toadstone!

Toads

By J.K. RowlingOriginally published on pottermore logo on Aug 10th 2015

Of the three approved animals permitted to students as pets at Hogwarts, the toad is, and has been for many years now, by far the least popular. Centuries ago, in blood-thirstier times, when young witches and wizards were expected to personally pop out the newt eyes they were using in potions, they routinely brought boxes of toads to school for use in potions and in other charms. Over time, as the Ministry of Magic introduced legislation regarding animal cruelty (sub-sections 13-29 inclusive relate to potion ingredients and their production) such practices were gradually outlawed. The toad, never much appreciated for its own personal appeal, gradually appeared (alive) less and less frequently at Hogwarts, unless hopping and swimming wild in the grounds.

By the time Harry arrived at Hogwarts, possession of a pet toad conveyed neither cool nor status; indeed, it was something of an embarrassment. Trevor, Neville’s toad, had nothing to commend him except a propensity for getting lost, and when he finally slipped off to join his brethren in the Hogwarts lake, both owner and pet felt a sense of relief.

J.K. Rowling’s thoughts

The toad has a long association with witchcraft, and was often believed to be a familiar. It occupies a special place in old folk cures, particularly (perhaps on the homeopathic principle of curing like with like) in the curing of warts. In the Dark Ages, a British toad could think itself lucky if it died of natural causes, because it was in constant danger of being boiled, powdered, skinned or tied around a sick human’s neck in a bag.

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Original Writing

Familiars

By J.K. RowlingOriginally published on pottermore logo on Aug 10th 2015

J.K. Rowling’s thoughts

The concept of ‘familiars’ has existed in British folklore for many hundreds of years. Familiars are animals (some say animal-shaped spirits) that serve a witch in various ways, whether as servants, messengers or even spies. Historical accounts of witchcraft make mention of familiars; such animals have been credited with supernatural gifts, and even believed to be demons (or the devil himself) in disguise.

Familiars, in the strictest sense, do not exist within the world of Harry Potter. Although Hogwarts students are permitted to bring animals to school with them, the cats and rats we see there are, broadly speaking, pets. Ironically, the animal that acts most like a traditional familiar in the entire series is Mrs Norris, who belongs to the castle’s only non-magical inhabitant, Argus Filch. It is true that owls are sent as messengers within the series, but this is in the context of a highly organised postal service, not unlike Muggle pigeon post.

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Trivia#27

When the Weasleys invite Harry and Hermione to the Quidditch World Cup, Ron is in awe of his favorite Quidditch player, Viktor Krum. He’s not so happy, however, when Krum shows up at Hogwarts and asks Hermione to the annual Yule Ball.

The Malfoy family

By J.K. RowlingOriginally published on pottermore logo on Aug 10th 2015

The Malfoy name comes from old French and translates as ‘bad faith’. Like many other progenitors of noble English families, the wizard Armand Malfoy arrived in Britain with William the Conqueror as part of the invading Norman army. Having rendered unknown, shady (and almost certainly magical) services to King William I, Malfoy was given a prime piece of land in Wiltshire, seized from local landowners, upon which his descendants have lived for ten consecutive centuries.

Their wily ancestor Armand encapsulated many of the qualities that have distinguished the Malfoy family to the present day. The Malfoys have always had the reputation, hinted at by their not altogether complimentary surname, of being a slippery bunch, to be found courting power and riches wherever they might be found. In spite of their espousal of pure-blood values and their undoubtedly genuine belief in wizards’ superiority over Muggles, the Malfoys have never been above ingratiating themselves with the non-magical community when it suits them. The result is that they are one of the richest wizarding families in Britain, and it has been rumoured for many years (though never proven) that over the centuries the family has dabbled successfully in Muggle currency and assets. Over hundreds of years, they have managed to add to their lands in Wiltshire by annexing those of neighbouring Muggles, and the favour they curried with royalty added Muggle treasures and works of art to an ever-expanding collection.

Historically, the Malfoys drew a sharp distinction between poor Muggles and those with wealth and authority. Until the imposition of the Statute of Secrecy in 1692, the Malfoy family was active within high-born Muggle circles, and it is said that their fervent opposition to the imposition of the Statute was due, in part, to the fact that they would have to withdraw from this enjoyable sphere of social life. Though hotly denied by subsequent generations, there is ample evidence to suggest that the first Lucius Malfoy was an unsuccessful aspirant to the hand of Elizabeth I, and some wizarding historians allege that the Queen’s subsequent opposition to marriage was due to a jinx placed upon her by the thwarted Malfoy.

With that healthy degree of self-preservation that has characterised most of their actions over the centuries, once the Statute of Secrecy had passed into law the Malfoys ceased fraternising with Muggles, however well-born, and accepted that further opposition and protests could only distance them from the new heart of power: the newly created Ministry of Magic. They performed an abrupt volte-face, and became as vocally supportive of the Statute as any of those who had championed it from the beginning, hastening to deny that they had ever been on speaking (or marrying) terms with Muggles.

The substantial wealth at their disposal ensured them considerable (and much resented) influence at the Ministry for generations to come, though no Malfoy has ever aspired to the role of Minister for Magic. It is often said of the Malfoy family that you will never find one at the scene of the crime, though their fingerprints might be all over the guilty wand. Independently wealthy, with no need to work for a living, they have generally preferred the role of power behind the throne, happy for others to do the donkey work and to take the responsibility for failure. They have helped finance many of their preferred candidates’ election campaigns, which have (it is alleged) included paying for dirty work such as hexing the opposition.

The Malfoys’ unfeigned contempt for all Muggles who could not offer them jewels or influence, and for the majority of their fellow wizards, drew them naturally towards the pure-blood doctrine, which seemed for several years in the twentieth century to be their likeliest source of untrammelled power. From the imposition of the Statute of Secrecy onwards, no Malfoy has married a Muggle or Muggle-born. The family has, however, eschewed the somewhat dangerous practice of inter-marrying within such a small pool of pure-bloods that they become enfeebled or unstable, unlike a small minority of fanatic families such as the Gaunts and Lestranges, and many a half-blood appears on the Malfoy family tree.

Notable Malfoys of past generations include the fourteenth-century Nicholas Malfoy, who is believed to have dispatched many a fractious Muggle tenant under the guise of the Black Death, though escaping censure by the Wizards’ Council; Septimus Malfoy, who was greatly influential at the Ministry in the late eighteenth century, many claiming that Minister for Magic Unctuous Osbert was little more than his puppet; and Abraxas Malfoy, who was widely believed to be part of the shady plot that saw the first Muggle-born Minister (Nobby Leach) leave his post prematurely in 1968 (nothing was ever proven against Malfoy).

Abraxas’s son, Lucius, achieved notoriety as one of Lord Voldemort’s Death Eaters, though he successfully evaded prison after both of Lord Voldemort’s attempted coups. On the first occasion, he claimed to have been acting under the Imperius Curse (though many claimed he called in favours from high-placed Ministry officials); on the second occasion, he provided evidence against fellow Death Eaters and helped ensure the capture of many of Lord Voldemort’s followers who had fled into hiding.

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Frodo and Harry Potter

Read an exclusive interview excerpt with producer David Heyman for Empire magazine’s Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings issue

Signature_Logo_WizardingWorldWritten byThe Wizarding World TeamPublished on Feb 12th 2021Empire magazine’s new issue celebrates the 20th anniversary of the Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings movies. Stuffed with brand-new interviews, including a conversation between Daniel Radcliffe and Elijah Wood, it also features a lengthy chat with Potter producer David Heyman, answering fan questions. Take a look at an exclusive excerpt.

Empire magazine are taking us all the way back to 2001, where the first Harry Potter film and Lord of the Rings film hit cinema screens in the same year, inviting viewers into new and enchanting worlds.

This year, we will be celebrating Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s/Sorcerer’s Stone’s 20th anniversary in many ways, inviting you all to join us in commemorating 20 years of movie magic. After all, this was the film that started everything – with Daniel Radcliffe’s Harry Potter discovering the wizarding world – and Hogwarts – for the very first time.

To kick off celebrations for this big anniversary, enjoy a sneak preview of Empire’s special edition of their magazine celebrating both films, which hits shops next Thursday.

Read on to enjoy this exclusive extract of Empire’s interview with producer of the films David Heyman, talking about Harry Potter book moments that didn’t make the films and a happy early memory from Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s/Sorcerer’s Stone.

Is there something from one of the books that didn’t make it into the films that you wish it had? – Sara Horvota

We always left things out that were painful. We shot [Rik Mayall as Hogwarts’ poltergeist] Peeves in the first film and I loved his anarchy, but it didn’t fit. I love the Quidditch from the fifth book – Ron is so funny and it was good character development, but there just wasn’t a place for it. S.P.E.W. – the Society for the Promotion of Elfish Welfare – was a wonderful part of the books, Hermione’s mission to protect these outsiders.

Not being able to film the Quidditch World Cup in Goblet of Fire – that was more because it was so spectacular. The backstory of the Marauders, of James and Sirius and Peter Pettigrew – that was such wonderful colour, and informed Harry’s relationship with Sirius in a really interesting way. Those are things I missed. But I do feel like we made the right choices for the films we were making. Kreacher was almost cut from the fifth film, and Jo [Rowling] said, “I wouldn’t do that if I were you, because he does have a role to play later on.” So Kreacher remained, and thankfully he did because he was a significant house elf.

Was there a moment when shooting the first film that you realised you truly had something special on your hands? – Luke Martin

I realised I had something special when I first read the book. I loved it. It moved me. I fell in love with it before it was published. I’ll never forget being on set that first day, filming the last scene of Philosopher’s Stone where Hagrid and Harry bid farewell at the railway station at Hogsmeade. Dan [Radcliffe] was wearing these contact lenses to make his eyes green, and he had an allergic reaction to them. His eyes were red and swollen and we had to take them out – we thought we may add that green digitally, though ultimately we decided not to because it felt artificial. But Dan’s eyes were puffy and red, and oddly it was quite appropriate for the scene where he was saying goodbye to Hagrid.